Thursday, April 10, 2008

Pre-Purchase Vet Exam

I've been reading a certain blog these days and I'm sure most of you have been there at least once as it is on the Power Guides blog roll. I feel sorry for these people and the fact that they have gotten really ripped off, but folks I really need to say this. You shouldn't fork out 20 grand on a yearling filly to buy over the Internet and without flying down to see her and especially not spend the extra couple hundred bucks for the pre-purchase exam with a vet you hire! This AQHA filly has Lordosis (swayback). They're documenting this filly's progress and there is a note of sour grapes when you read and I appreciate their efforts in keeping this horse as I believe they are now stuck. It's interesting reading and I hope it's a lesson learned for anyone who reads that blog. Maybe that will be what good comes out of it and it sounds like she has a loving new home anyway. Guns and White Roses , Good Luck to them and their endeavors.

16 comments:

Midlife Mom said...

I can't imagine forking out that kind of money without a vet check. I'll have to go read the site and see what's going on.
Yes, it scares me to death too when my guys get running and leaping and sliding around when it's muddy. It's REALLY muddy here, just a mess, I can't wait till it dries up. At least everyone is shedding out pretty well except the ponies and they are always last to shed.

Rising Rainbow said...

I have seen the site although I haven't read it recently. They clearly know that they screwed up. I think that fact she missed out on a white horse of similiar breeding influenced her haste reaction to just go ahead and purchase. She thought that she could count on pedigree to protect her. It is a hard lesson to learn. Many people think pedigree is everything but it's just a peice of paper with names on it. It means nothing without looking at the phenotype as well.

I applaud them for posting so maybe others can learn by their mistakes. That is one of the reasons that they decided to blog. I know they take a lot of flack for doing so but it is an important story to be told.

I think their frustration comes from the response of the breeders. They keep insisting that there is nothing wrong with the horse and she will just grow out of it. I think butting up against that over and over would tend to make one bitter.

Callie said...

I agree, Mikael, and understand their frustration, but I still insist that this is partially their fault. Neither of my horses are pedigreed. They are both grade. I bought Misty from my best friend's boyfriend. I did come over and look at her first. I did not do a pre-purchase exam. I paid only $700. I bought Kola through a reputable breeder and ranch. I did pay for a pre-purchase exam and spent $3,700 for her. I know both minor amounts, but to fork over that kind of money without an exam is truly a lesson learned. Of course the breeder isn't going to acknowledge the defect. And I think you are right, I too applaud them for blogging about it. It goes to the old saying, "Let the buyer beware."

Pony Girl said...

When my parents bought my mom's gelding I really wanted them to get a vet check but they didn't want to, they were already on a limited budget and the gelding's cost was considerably over that budget. I wanted them to at least get a second opinion from their instructor and they ended up cancelling that at the last minute. Two months after they got him home her instructor said he was moving off a little on one side, and another woman took one look at him from behind and said he had a dropped hip. Even though I knew horses, it has been years since I had been "living horses" and I did not pick up on this when we tried him out (I did think his hip looked a little odd, but thought that was just the way he was built.) It doesn't seem to affect him and it probably happened when he was a yearling and he has just learned to compensate for it (he's 10.) He might get stiff or arthritis in it when he is older. My mom just trail and pleasure rides so it is fine. Despite this minor flaw and the fact he is a grade horse, he is a good boy and worth his weight and gold.

Callie said...

Pony girl, I too have one that I did not do a pre-purchase on, she is grade and in my opinion also worth her weight in gold.

Kathy C said...

Callie I have read the blog, but like Mikael, not for awhile. My first thought was "no pre-purchase exam?"

The last horse we bought we did one and it was by far the best investment we have ever made. The vet did such a fine job that we knew the horse inside and out before we even loaded her up. The previous owners said he spent over 2 hours at their place checking her out, and we got a very detailed report on every little thing you can imagine.

The two horses we bought before that I had a pre-purchase exam on, and it was a glance over at best. We paid very little for the horses, and probably got what we paid for them.

I had never heard of that particular deformity before, so I am glad they are getting the word out, and I think many will learn about pre-purchase exams as well and their value.

Callie said...

Kathy C., I agree whole heartily. It sounds as if they will keep this filly and work with her, which tells me she is in good hands. I think that it is good that they are documenting her progress and it is a hard and expensive lesson learned. I too hope that others learn from it as I'm sure that is why they are documenting it.

Callie said...

midlife mom, didn't forget you, I agree.

ranchette said...

Amen sister. Not getting the pre-purchase was an unfortuante illustration penny wise and pound foolish.

Grey Horse Matters said...

I haven't had a chance to read the post, but no on should ever buy a horse without a pre-purchase exam and I prefer x-rays too. For that kind of money it is a must. Even for a small amount of money it should be a no brainer, you are going to have the horse and have to take care of it and train it, why would you knowingly take a horse with problems, unless it was a rescue or a companion horse or whatever, you should always know what you will be in for ahead of time.

BrownEyed Cowgirls said...

Wow-I jumped over and scanned some of their blog. If they had only went to look at her-they wouldn't have had to bother with the pre-purchase exam. I have to say that I don't really believe in them. No, I am not spending that kind of money on horses but even if I was, I can't say that I would do a pre-purchase unless getting insurance required it. But, good lord, I have never bought a horse sight unseen.
I have only ever had one horse x-rayed before purchase and this was an older barrel horse that had a big knee. I know he wasn't lame under ordinary use, but I wanted to see if there was anything in the knee that would cause a problem running barrels. He ended up being fine. No chips or anything. Never had him take a lame step.
Obviously, I think the breeders of this horse should have refunded the money but because I haven't read the whole blog-I don't know what circumbstances are...
The bottom line is if you are spending that kind of money and can't take the time to go look at what you are buying in person, then the old saying applies...a fool and his money are soon parted.

photogchic said...

Crazy situation. Can't imagine not doing a PPE and x-rays on even a free horse. Hopefully they love the little horse anyway and give it a good home.

Mrs Mom said...

I saw a really really sweet horse yesterday that is in a lease situation.... when I watched him move though, alarm bells went off in a very LOUD manner.

What are your thoughts everyone, on a pre- LEASE exam? We always hear about pre-purchase exams, but what about a LEASE? I dont think I have ever heard of anyone doing that...

Callie said...

ranchette, totally agree. With that kind of money spent....well.

GHM, ditto!

BEC, I think that you are right about the breeder, but they are now stuck. And should have at least gone to see it.Buyer beware!

mrs.mom, I think that should be entirely up to the person leasing, technically they don't own the horse, and it would depend on the contract and what the leasee is responsible for.

Callie said...

photochic, I do think they have grown to care about this little filly and I believe it's in a good home.

Mrs Mom said...

I have "inside info" on Rose and her family- Rose indeed did wind up in a wonderful home, where she will be WELL cared for. Her Mom, Amy, is a good horsewoman, and they take excellent care of their horses. Rose got lucky- she wound up in a great spot, and as long as she is there, she will be in fantastic hands.

I think that she wound up there BECAUSE they will provide a fantastic home, with the opportunity for the rest of us to learn not only about Equine Lordosis, but to stop and make people think about horse dealers in general.

Pretty amazing how the world works now and again isnt it? ;)